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The Mass of Ice in Water

A video of our experiment can be found HERE!

 

Question: Does the volume of an ice cube affect its mass?

 

Hypothesis: If the volume of the ice cube decreases then the mass of the ice cube would remain the same because the volume will not affect the mass.

 

Independent Variable:

        Mass of the ice cube.

 

Dependent Variable:

        Volume of the ice cube.

 

Constants:

        Type of ice

        Melting the ice completely

 

Materials:

        ice cubes

        baby food jar

        Electronic scale

        1 thermometer

 

Procedure:

1.      Gather all of your materials.

2.      Put the ice in the jar.

3.      Mass the jar with the ice.

4.      Wait for the ice to melt.

5.      Mass the melted ice and jar.

6.      Repeat steps 2-5 ten more times.

 

Data Table:

 

 

Trial #

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

Ice (g)

84.7

85.8

82.6

84.2

83.2

82.7

83.2

85.7

84.0

110.0

99.1

Water (g)

84.7

85.8

82.7

84.1

83.2

82.7

83.2

85.7

84.0

110.0

99.1

 

Graph:

 

Conclusion:

The hypothesis, if the volume of the ice cube decreases then the mass of the ice cube would remain the same because the volume will not affect the mass, is supported by the data. As seen in the data table and results, when the ice is melted and the volume decreased, the mass on the other hand, remained the same. There were two trials where we found a 0.1g change from before to after. This is attributed to the sensitivity of our electronic balance. It can only read in increments of 0.1 and because the last digit is rounded, we find this change to be insignificant.

 

Sources of error:

1.      When shaking the jar to melt the ice some of the water leaked out from the jar because the cap didnít fit. This affected our data because when the water did leak out, the mass would decrease.

2.      When measuring the mass of the jar and ice together, the scale would increase or decrease because of the pressure on the table in which the scale was placed on. This affected our data because it changed the mass we recorded by 0.1 grams.

 

Our results are reliable because we repeated the experiment 11 times and only 2 out of the 11 trials did the mass not stay the same during the process from solid to liquid due to the sources of error stated above in addition to the sensitivity of the scale. If we were to repeat this experiment we would change the location of the scale and making sure the cap fits properly on the jar to minimize the sources of errors that we had.